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Cramer Dental
Your Blue Bell, PA Dentist


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Dental Crown


Rendering of jaw with dental crownDental crowns are used to strengthen and improve the shape, size or color of teeth. They can support broken or weak teeth or those with large fillings; provide a smooth, strong, attractively contoured surface for stained, misshapen or otherwise abnormal teeth; and aid in the implantation of bridges and other implants.

Having to visit your dentist’s practice can be a stressful experience for some people. We understand that. The more that you are informed about a procedure, the less hesitant you will be to get it done. In order to help our patients understand the options they have regarding the care of their mouths, we like to inform them about these procedures here at Cramer Dental. There are some similarities between a root canal and a crown. Having some knowledge about the differences between the two will help you decide which one is right for you.

What is a Root Canal?


A root canal is commonly performed when a cavity has reached considerable levels, indicating that decay has reached the pulp of the tooth. Nerves are found in the pulp of a tooth, which is the component of the tooth that contains the nerves. In severe circumstances, the nerve may even become exposed, which can be quite painful in certain scenarios. This form of infection cannot simply be filled since it would not prevent the infection from spreading to other regions of the body.

A root canal is completed if there has been a major oral accident that has caused the tooth to be damaged. The tooth is desensitized throughout the root canal procedure, which normally takes only a couple of sessions to complete. There is a considerable likelihood that the tooth will be brittle after a root canal operation is performed. However, this will depend on the specific case. At this stage in the operation, it may be required to install a post and a crown.

What is a Crown?


A crown is placed on your tooth following a root canal operation to safeguard it. It can also be placed on the tooth in rare situations if there is a large cavity on the tooth that has not yet reached the tooth’s soft pulp. In this scenario, the tooth is usually ground down and an imprint of the remaining teeth is taken before proceeding with the surgery. Temporary crowns must be put over the tooth to protect it from additional illness or damage before a permanent crown can be placed over it. It might take anything from a few days to a few weeks for the permanent crown to be completed.

After the tooth has been corrected, the temporary crown will be removed and replaced with a permanent crown. As previously stated, having a root canal performed on a crowned tooth is not always essential. A post is not required to be placed in the event of a tooth that has not had a root canal. The post is typically used to strengthen the tooth prior to the placement of a crown. Although the distinctions between a crown and a root canal may appear clear, these two treatments may be extremely closely connected, despite the fact that they are totally separate procedures.

Please contact our team at Cramer Dental if you have any questions about dental crowns and want to know when you need them. If you would like to schedule a consultation with us, please give us a call at (610) 272-0404.




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Cramer Dental- Dr Craig Cramer, 978 Dekalb Pike, Blue Bell, PA 19422, (610) 272-0404, smilesbycramer.com, 1/30/2023, Page Keywords: General Dentist Blue Bell PA,